The Earlier The Better: The Importance Of Getting A Head Start On Your Health Coverage

Around 44 million individuals across the US do not have health insurance, according to the findings of PBS.org. The thing about the topic of health coverage is that it only tends to come up when you’re already afflicted with an illness or when you feel pain or discomfort. The truth is that you shouldn’t wait until you actually need health coverage before you get some. To that end, there are significant benefits to putting in an effort into planning out your healthcare early on.

Life Plans 

Starting the search for suitable health insurance early gives you the chance to tailor it to fit your life plans — especially if it includes travel. After all, it is reasonable to expect that the costs of healthcare would differ from one country to another. For example, let’s say you’re considering retiring in Australia. The average annual insurance payment for someone over 50 in Australia is AUD$2,208.96, according to the data of Finder. In the US, the annual cost would be USD$8,016, as estimated by ValuePenguin. Starting early with the search for health coverage gives you the benefit of looking over your options for changing your health insurer. As you may imagine, this is good, as there are a lot of different insurance companies out there. Always consider your lifestyle and any long-term plans when you look over premium options.

Mitigating Costs

There is no doubting the fact that the cost of medical expenses can be staggering. In the US, the cost of healthcare is projected to increase by 5.5% each year until 2027, according to the report published in Health Affairs. In order to avoid joining the many bankrupted by medical costs, having health insurance is an important shield to have. Health insurance can also help cover any hospital stays and ambulance transfers — these are some of the unexpected medical costs that catch people unaware. Getting insurance early protects you from being blindsided by unexpected costs.

Benefit Of Time

Health insurance companies do have their share of bureaucracy, and that’s something you’ll have to adjust to. It takes approximately three weeks after your enrollment in an insurance plan and initial payment for your insurance to be fully approved. Those three weeks can be life-changing for those who need immediate surgery or medical attention. If you put in the effort to obtain health insurance while you’re young and it gets approved before you need it, you buy yourself the benefit of time. So when the time comes that you actually need your health insurance, all you have to deal with is the pre-approval between your physician and your insurance company.

Better Coverage

One of the significant benefits of shopping around for health insurance while you’re young is that you are in better health. This is particularly true if you have no pre-existing health conditions, so there is less risk for the insurance company should they offer you health coverage. Should any conditions arise later on, you are automatically covered, so that’s one less thing for you to worry about. If you’re leading a relatively healthy and active life, you will tend to pay less. Also, early health coverage protects your finances should you develop any conditions years after your initial coverage.

 Your health isn’t something that you should think about only when you’re feeling poorly, and it’s in your best interests to be proactive about your health coverage while you’re still young. That said, take your time and be discerning about the options available to you, and see how they fit your life. Once you’re covered, you can go on and enjoy your life without the fear of being exposed to a large and sudden medical expense.

Last updated on August 9th, 2019

Editorial Team

Academic Association of Medicine is the go to resource for all health related issues. We are an independent body that seeks to offer general information on various health topics and unbiased reviews on health products.

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